Pinterest and Personalities

I jumped on the Pinterest bandwagon many, MANY moons ago – truly back in its infancy. In 2010 I was still in the Fashion Industry when making trend and mood boards was a key component of my work. (Yes…I LOVED it!) 🙂 I was a lucky lady, and couldn’t have been more in my element.

I was a devourer of all things visual… It didn’t necessarily matter if a photo in question was of an actual SHOE or not (ladies footwear being the branch in which I worked for well over a decade.) I could use everything from images with obvious connections (footwear, handbags, accessories etc) to things that were more abstract (makeup artistry, rain-drenched sidewalk bricks, a caramel apple…) It really didn’t matter, so long as the color, or vibe, or depth captured what I was intending to weave into a story… A story that would serve as the basis for the colors, materials, and styles we’d select for that season, essentially…

So for me, Pinterest was a GOLD mine. I wish it had been around sooner, but I was thrilled to work with it back then…in spite of bugs and growing pains. It was massively addictive for me as a Fashion Director, but also just a highly visual person. It proved (and still does) equally as addictive for hoards of the – primarily female, as you might surmise – population. 

I can’t say that I’m on the site quite as much these days, but I still pull images with reasonable frequency. Each time I do so, I find myself smiling because Pinterest is so much more than what a large majority of people see it as being – as in, a board for to-dos or must-haves. For me it is more of a drool-fest – at least as far as my overarching usage goes. I pin images that I want to wrap myself in somehow…if not entirely and ravenously imbibe. They’re delicious, in a word (and to reduce it to one is a painful exercise!)

But there are boards I have created that do include things I would buy, or might should some event arise… For example, my Pinups and Fabulousness board… There are a plethora of sassy images – the just-for-fun-and-isnspiration kind. But then there are the pencil dresses or obscenely luscious heels that I desperately want a reason to buy – so says the tiny sliver of typical-female that I possess (because it really is a lot tinier than the grossly-generalized stereotype.)

Anyway, the real fun in Pinterest is that it is – I believe – a full-on snapshot of a person’s personality – it’s a lot more colorful than a Facebook, and I daresay farther reaching into the depth of one’s character than an Instagram (remember, these are images we can easily pull from every nook and cranny of the global Interweb ether!) It also happens to allow for the multiple facets of our being – I’m several things in one Geminian bundle myself. . .

For example…it would take under a second to see that I am obsessed with 50s glam – but not the frillier, cheesecake pinup fashion, so much as the badassery of Bettie Page. I’m all about fitted, curve-hugging, sensual shapes and lines… I have a gothic sensibility overall, which is glaringly obvious, paired with a little bit of “show” (performer much of my life, after all!) I love long heels and edgy details (like Paciotti’s infamous dagger going down the back of these killer heels…)

So if you are ever wondering about a person…check to see if they have any Interest boards out there. You’ll be amazed what you can learn . . .

I’ll share more of my boards later (unless you feel like looking now…) because it’s far too much to consume at once. In fact, a single board might prove daunting to the mundane mind! For me, though, it’s like a pool I dive into as much as I can (knowing that I must proceed with caution, lest I be pulled into the seductive undertow of image pinning!)

Autism Humor – I’m Taking It With Me

I have the honor to volunteer with many children with autism and there are some things that just go with the territory (aside from the fact that I’m always smiling – they light me up every time! 🙂 )

Many of the children I have the joy to work with like to bring personal items along with them to play time (or wear something they love.) We typically don’t allow them to bring toys from home, heaven forbid something is lost in the shuffle – the organization I work with has a TON of toys for the children to play with, so outside items could easily disappear.

Still, when they really WANT to bring something (for example, little felt pieces in the shape of animals) chances are a mountain will be made into a molehill by not going with the flow. Trying to separate them from a comfortable “known” can be a lot more trouble than it’s worth and frankly, at the end of the day, there’s nothing at all wrong with that (particularly in a less frequented environment.)

We do, however, have to keep a sharp eye out so that they also go home with everything they brought along!

Learning About Life Through Another Lens, And How Blessed We All Really Are…

Some weeks ago I started an ASL (American Sign Language) course online – I regularly volunteer with children with disabilities and had asked a mom (whose four year-old boy both has autism and is deaf) for some ASL resources. Her son additionally suffers from a little bit of separation anxiety, which isn’t horribly uncommon with autism – when he comes to our volunteer play sessions, there are times that he begins to cry and it’s terribly tricky to discern what will make him feel more comfortable. While I was already interested in learning ASL (up to 50% of autistic individuals are non-verbal), this little guy was enough to get me on the road to finding a class…as soon as possible.

The awesome news is that I also volunteer with Special Olympics-driven skating sessions once a week that includes a number of children who are either hard of hearing or completely deaf. There’s nothing quite like being able to communicate with them – being able to sign even a single word is exciting! (I definitely have a way to go!)

A couple of days ago, though, I came down with a cold of some kind – as a result of contagiously coughing, I lost my voice – and I mean completely. Talk about being in someone else’s shoes…

Horribly uncomfortable a “bug” is for any of us, it’s nothing compared to what some children and adults have to deal with on a regular, and life-long basis. In a strange way, I feel thankful that I can’t speak because it’s an exercise in understanding what it *might* be like – while I consider myself to be one of the most empathetic people I know, it is impossible to fully understand anyone’s experience without being in their skin.

I have lost my voice on one other occasion – remarkably, I was 16 spending a month in France, with very little French under my belt. I guess life likes to test my ability to communicate (which – as is clear – is NOT always done with speech.)

In any case, it’s as the saying goes – you don’t always realize what you have until you lose it. I’d never anticipate not having the ability to speak was an easy road…but it is a welcome experience. (Now I’m not exactly encouraging anyone to go out to a concert and scream at the top of his or her lungs to deliberately subdue the vocal chords…I’m just saying, there is good to everything. Yes, including getting sick and losing a primary means of communication.)

Now my husband has a little bit of a challenge playing the guessing game as far as “what is my wife trying to say now?” He’s doing a remarkable job of deciphering, decoding, and understanding what I am trying to say, and that’s not easy to do! So I’m very fortunate to have the support and patience.

Going to the store is also an enlightening experience – I can’t say “thank you,” or “excuse me” as I normally would, nor can I respond vocally to others. That leaves me feeling a little bit awkward as reciprocal speech is one of the key forms of communication many of us learned from infancy. When I indicate with gesture and my lips that I have lost my voice, people either immediately begin to whisper or act altogether more gently – it’s incredibly interesting! (I actually can’t even whisper, as that puts more stress on the vocal chords than speaking does!)

The other side of it is that I’m derailed from my activities – in part I simply don’t feel up to them physically. The pain and discomfort though. . .I think about all the children with autism suffering from sensory sensitivities without the ability to say “those lights are hurting my eyes,” “this fabric makes my skin burn,” “my chest hurts….” What is life like for them? Many “behavioral issues” are a result of such a scenario – they don’t have a means to say what they are feeling.

For the children who are deaf or hard of hearing, thankfully they do have words at their disposal (albeit non-speech, hand / facial /body gestures.) I learned “sick,” “feel,” “bathroom,” and “okay?” as quickly as I could. Fortunately I’m learning many other words too…but knowing that it will take time, it’s important I know some basics.

Even if I was feeling better, my usual day-to-day would still be a substantial challenge – I can’t make a singe phone call, for one. I can’t ask for help locating a medicine at the store. If I were in an office, I’d have to type everything out (doable, but less efficient.) I certainly can’t breakdown a Ninjutsu technique the way I could by asking questions in class, and I definitely can’t teach or volunteer. I have to rely on gestures to talk to others I might run into in my own apartment building because I am utterly devoid of my usual method of communication…

So it’s been a remarkable few days…

While I’m sure it’s not fun to be around me while I’m loudly coughing, slower-moving, and unable to answer even the easiest question, I feel truly thankful for the experience. In fact, I’m taking the opportunity to review videos from the ASL course modules that I’ve already completed – I will hopefully be seeing the Special Olympics kids on Wednesday to skate and I know a few happy ones who use ASL exclusively. 🙂 

Humor – Casper The Ghost On Mean Pills (Or Me Up To No Good!)

This cartoon is positively precious, especially the famously gentle Ghost’s facial expression at the end. . .

Cartoon it may be (I used to play Casper, Disney Halloween, and other slides in my View Master as a kid), I related completely. . .

Much like the sweet white sprite, I hate – yes, I dare even say vehemently hate – “mean.” “MEAN” for me is an ultimate last resort. (I’m betting Casper is on board with “mean what you say, say what you mean, don’t say it mean” wagon too.)

Of course he’s as adorable as can be, bowled over by the initial effect just as much as when he surprisedly sprouts an impossibly cute tail. But…the face at the end was a relatable laugh-out-loud.  It’s more of a sneaky look than anything else, and I feel like I unconsciously get that look from time to time…

Maybe it’s that I absconded with some vegetables and got away with it. Maybe I thought of something silly and fun to make a loved one laugh… Whatever the case may be, it’s a deliciously diabolical smirk he’s got going on, and I’m pretty sure I do that at times myself (save to say, I’m not remotely as adorable as this lil’ devil!)